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Environmental Studies

ENVRN 7, Introduction to Environmental Studies   3 units

Transfer: UC, CSU • IGETC AREA 4 (Social and Behavioral Sciences) • Prerequisite: None.

This course satisfies the Santa Monica College Global Citizenship requirement.

This introductory course will use an interdisciplinary approach to provide students with a broad perspective on environmental problems and solutions. Students will be introduced to the strategies used by scientists, economists, political analysts, and other writers and researchers to investigate and analyze environmental and urban issues, human/nature relationships, natural and built environments, and environmental citizenship.

Environmental Studies 7 is the same course as Geography 7. Students may earn credit for one, but not both.

4177   6:45p-9:50p T   HSS 263   Selby W A

ENVRN 20, Environmental Ethics    3 units

Transfer: UC, CSU • IGETC AREA 3B (Humanities) • Prerequisite: None. • Skills Advisory: Eligibility for English 1.

This course satisfies the Santa Monica College Global Citizenship requirement.

This course introduces the field of environmental ethics with an emphasis on global environmental problems and global citizenship. The conceptual foundations of environmental attitudes and values are examined through an historical survey of philosophies of nature and human/nature relations. Ethical theories are presented and used to analyze contemporary environmental problems, e.g. mistreatment of animals, pollution, climate change, species extinction, natural resource depletion, environmental racism etc. The ethical assumptions underlying various national and international responses to environmental problems will be analyzed and evaluated.

Envrn 20 is the same course as Philos 20. Students may earn credit for one but not both.

2017   12:45p-2:05p TTh   HSS 155   Bennet S E

ENVRN 22, Environmental Politics and Policies    3 units

Transfer: UC, CSU • IGETC AREA 4 (Social and Behavioral Sciences) • Prerequisite: None. • Skills Advisory: Eligibility for English 1.

This course satisfies the Santa Monica College Global Citizenship requirement.

This course examines environmental politics, including, but not limited to the issues of population, natural resource use, habitat loss, global climate change and pollution. The political, economic, and social origins of environmental change and degradation are examined, as well as democratic, bureaucratic and market-based solutions to environmental problems advocated by environmental movements, interest groups and political parties. Arguments for best public policy responses to a range of environmental problems will be assessed and debated. The course offers a practical problem-solving approach which includes local, state, national and global environmental politics. Course content focuses primarily on political concepts, such as sustainable development and ecological democracy, and on the relations between a range of contemporary political values and the environmental policy recommendations of each. The course explores various perspectives on what it means to take political responsibility for reducing the human impact on the earth.

2018   9:30a-10:50a TTh   HSS 154   Oifer E R

ENVRN 40, Environmental Psychology    3 units

Transfer: UC, CSU • Prerequisite: None.

This course satisfies the Santa Monica College Global Citizenship requirement.

This course will focus on the theory and application of psychological principles as they relate to the causes of, and potential solutions to, current global environmental problems. Modern ecological issues (such as global climate change, habitat-loss, etc.) have their historical origin in human behavior; this class will focus both on relevant causal behaviors, and on the mental mechanisms that give rise to such behavior. An evolutionary perspective will be employed to identify the pathways by which the clash of a “universal human nature” and the modern environment results in an “evolutionary mismatch.” Evolutionary models such as the “tragedy of the commons” will be elucidated with relevant and real world examples. In addition, the course will explore potential avenues to effectively reshape human kind’s social, technological and economic relationship with its environment. As such, a systems approach will be taken that considers the human as a part of, as well as an influence on, ecosystems. Cutting edge research will be integrated from different domains of psychology (cognitive, social, developmental and evolutionary, etc.) as well as related fields (genetics, behavioral economics, game-theory, anthropology, etc.) to comprehensively study the human-environment interaction.

ENVRN 40 is the same course as PSYCH 40. Students may earn credit for one but not both.

4464   5:45p-8:50p Mon   HSS 254   Schwartz A F

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